Law Office of Paul Petrillo

Contact Us Today 603-635-4149

Contact Us Today

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Child custody in New Hampshire focuses on the child

| Jul 4, 2019 | Child Custody |

Parents always strive to do what’s best for their children. Divorce or separation often complicates these efforts, since parents may find it difficult to co-parent once they are not living together. New Hampshire courts do their best to help parents and children in this situation.

The directive for courts dealing with child custody and child support in the Granite State is to do what’s in the best interests of the child. Although this may include the current desires and preferences of the child, what’s objectively in their best interests may not always make the kids happy. Emotions are often high for both adults and children involved in divorces.

Courts consider the child’s apparent relationship with each of their parents as well as each parent’s ability to create a safe and loving environment. Boys’ and girls’ ability to adapt to new environments, which may include an analysis of their developmental stages and needs, is also part of the calculation for family court judges.

These are considerations even when parents largely agree on how to split or assign custody of their children. If there is a dispute, a judge may forward a case to mediation in the hope that conflicts can be resolved before a ruling would have to be enforced.

Parents considering their child custody preferences and abilities may retain legal counsel to help with applications and petitions to the court. Lawyers are also able to represent clients’ interests in mediation and other dealings out of court. No parents should have to deal with this transition with the proper professional guidance.

FindLaw Network