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Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

How do you prove irreconcilable differences for no-fault divorce?

On Behalf of | Jan 12, 2022 | Divorce |

Most of the time when a New Hampshire couple divorces, it will be a no-fault divorce filing. Either spouse can claim irreconcilable differences and initiate the divorce process. The spouse filing a no-fault divorce must feel that there has been a significant breakdown of the marital relationship and that reconciliation isn’t possible.

It is common for the spouse who files for divorce to desperately want to end the marriage while the other spouse would prefer to stay married. Getting a divorce from someone who wants the marriage to last can be particularly difficult. What do you need to prove if you claim irreconcilable differences when you file for divorce in New Hampshire?

A no-fault filing requires no actual evidence

One of the reasons that so many people choose a no-fault divorce based on irreconcilable differences is that they have nothing to prove in court to get a divorce. Even if one spouse says the relationship is fine, the opinion of the other is enough reason for the courts to grant a divorce.

When someone files for a divorce based on cause or grounds, they have to show the court that their allegations are true. You have to prove infidelity or abuse to divorce for either of those causes. However, someone suffering through abuse or dealing with an unfaithful spouse can file for a no-fault divorce without needing to convince the courts about their spouse’s misconduct.

Most people will find that this faster solution is a better approach than trying to conclusively show that their spouse caused the breakdown of their marital relationship. Learning more about New Hampshire divorce laws can help you plan for the end of your marriage.

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