Brand Logo

Contact Us Today 603-635-4149

Contact Us Today

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

Due to precautions related to COVID-19, we have expanded our options for remote consultations. Please contact our office to discuss whether a full phone consultation or video conference is appropriate for your situation. We can still accommodate in person meetings as well, while being mindful of social distancing guidelines.

There Is Help.
There Is A Solution

New Hampshire offers no-fault and at-fault divorces

On Behalf of | Feb 23, 2022 | Divorce |

In New Hampshire, you may seek a no-fault divorce, or you can base your divorce on one of several acceptable fault grounds. No-fault divorces typically proceed faster and cost less, making it the preferred option to end a marriage.

Other advantages of a no-fault divorce include:

  • Reduces stress and anxiety
  • Imposes fewer hardships on children
  • Keeps communication open (critical when you share kids)

However, there may be occasions when an at-fault divorce better serves you and your family.

What are the divorce grounds in New Hampshire?

You have several fault grounds to choose from when divorcing in the state. Examples include:

  • Desertion (at least two years)
  • Adultery
  • Extreme cruelty
  • Impotency
  • Injury to physical or mental health
  • Habitual drunkenness
  • Imprisonment

If you are considering a fault-based divorce, you should understand that it can be hard to prove in a family law court.

Does an at-fault divorce ever make sense?

It depends on your circumstances and your divorce goals. Since each divorce is unique, you will likely benefit from seeking professional guidance when deciding how to end your marriage. For some, an at-fault divorce offers an opportunity to hold the other spouse accountable for their marital misdeeds. However, in most situations, a fault-based divorce provides few (if any) additional benefits.

Another thing to consider is that you will have to prove that your spouse engaged in the fault ground you selected. Further, your spouse has the right to defend against the accusations you make, possibly making your divorce take longer and cost more than with a no-fault divorce.

To help you decide, we suggest that you become familiar with New Hampshire divorce and property division laws before filing your petition.

Archives

RSS FEED

FindLaw Network